Making sense of my photography hobby in retirement

Taranaki

Piebald Skies

If ever I am called to go to another town or city for pleasure of for business I try to get out for an early morning walk.  For me, it’s the best time of the day.  It’s the time before most people begin to move, and the time when the light is clear, the sun is still low, and the air is fresh.

It was on such a morning that I took my morning walk along the coastal walkway at New Plymouth in the Taranaki region of New Zealand.  Taranaki occupies that area of the large western cape of the North Island of New Zealand.  Its central feature is Mt Taranaki, a Fuji look-alike that dominates the landscape throughout the region.  The coastal walkway stretches 11 km from the Port Taranaki, past the New Plymouth CBD, then on around the cliffs and beaches in a northerly direction. It’s popular with walkers, runners and cyclists.

New Plymouth Coastal Walkway, Taranaki, New Zealand, Copyright Chris Gregory 2013

Fitzroy Beach from the New Plymouth Coastal Walkway

New Plymouth Coastal Walkway, Taranaki, New Zealand, Copyright Chris Gregory 2013

Resting and viewing area beneath the cliffs just north of the New Plymouth CBD

New Plymouth Coastal Walkway, Taranaki, New Zealand, Copyright Chris Gregory 2013

Port Taranaki and New Plymouth CBD. The “wand” on the foreshore next to the rectangular white building is an installation art piece designed by artist Len Lye.

On this particular morning there was a lovely piebald sky that added to the enjoyment of the walk.


Shining Mountain

Shining Mountain, Taranaki, Mt Egmont, New Zealand, Copyright Chris Gregory 2012

Shining Mountain, Taranaki

The dominant feature of the Taranaki landscape in the western part of the North Island of New Zealand is this conical dormant volcano which last erupted in the mid nineteenth century.  Prior to European discovery by Captain Cook in the late 18th century the mountain was known to the Maori as Taranaki, thought to be derived from two words Tara (mountain) and ngaki (shining).  When Captain Cook discovered New Zealand he named the mountain after John Perceval, 2nd Earl of Egmont, the First Lord of the Admiralty who promoted Cook’s first voyage.  In 1986 the Government ruled that there would be two alternative and equal official names, “Mount Taranaki” or “Mount Egmont”.

The flat land that surrounds Taranaki is very fertile and ideal for dairy farming and the region is one of the three major milk producing areas in the country.  The other key economic driver in Taranaki is oil and natural gas which was discovered in 1865 but only exploited on a large commercial scale after 1959.

On the day this image was taken the weather was changeable, but clearing.  We were hoping for a clear view of the mountain but the lingering clouds from a westerly front that had passed over the region in the previous day still hung about.  Taranaki is the first place on the North Island to cop incoming south-westerly fronts which ensure that the grass is always lush to produce the “white gold” of the dairy industry. On a clear winter day the mountain is magnificent with its crown of snow glistening in the sunlight.


Every Cloud Has a Silver Lining

Mt Taranaki, Mt Egmont, Taranaki, New Zealand, Copyright Chris Gregory 2012

Mt Taranaki, New Zealand

Bad things don’t stay bad forever.  After twelve days in hospital, that included surgery to “repair” her leg that was fractured in a skiing accident, my wife was transferred to another hospital in Auckland for continued monitoring and treatment.  As she was “well enough” to fly on a commercial flight she was sent on her way with an escort (me).  The ninety minute flight from Dunedin travels north along the eastern side of the Southern Alps, giving views of Aoraki (Mt Cook – 3,754 m) and other significant peaks, before crossing Cook Strait to the North Island and passing east of Taranaki (Mt Egmont) to Auckland.  The above image of snow-capped Taranaki (2,518 m) through a hole in the clouds was a real bonus. Had we returned to Auckland as originally planned this view would have been obscured by bad weather.


Coastal Walkway – New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand

I visit New Plymouth at least four times a year but last week was the first time I have managed to get in an early morning walk instead of having to rush to the airport to catch the plane back to Auckland.  New Plymouth is the home of New Zealand’s oil industry which has brought prosperity to the region over the past 30 years. One of the beneficiaries of this wealth has been the creation of a coastal walkway from the city centre around the cliffs to the north.  Throughout the day people walk, jog, ride their bikes and exercise their dogs along the concrete concourse.  Occasionally viewing platforms are provided like the one featured here.

Sony Alpha DSLR – A200, 1/50 sec, F16, ISO 100, Sigma DC 18-200 3.5-6.3 zoom lensPreview